Monday, July 29, 2013

borrowing breath from its Creator.

There is an old hymn that I love. The name of it escapes me, but there is a line in this song that says, "I'll love Thee in life, I will love Thee in death, I will praise Thee as long as Thou lendest me breath." A preacher one Sunday morning mentioned this line. I meditated on it and how every breath we have comes from God and ultimately we have zero control over when God stops giving us breath.

And then I thought about the word "lendest". When someone lends something to you, they expect to get it back. That is the purpose and meaning of the word.

God gave us breath and He gave us a free will and I'm not forced to use it for Him, but that's why He gave it to me. That's the expectation.

God picked up the dust from the fresh earth and molded and shaped with His own hands until He formed a man. A dead man. God formed a dead man. Adam had zero life in him. He had a heart. He had blood. He had lungs, a brain, kidneys, intestines. He was perfect, except he had no life. Until God stooped down and breathed His sweet breath into this new man's nostrils. And as soon as God breathed into him He expected Adam to breathe it right back. To breathe it back in service and love and worship and adoration and praise. To breathe it back as he named the animals and tended the garden.

In the same moment that I decided to follow Jesus, God breathed His sweet breath of life into my nostrils. And in the same moment that God breathed His sweet breath of life into my nostrils, He expected me to breathe it right back. To breathe it back in service and love and worship and adoration and praise. To breathe it back as I sang to Him and shared His Gospel.

God sent Ezekiel to prophesy to the bones in the midst of the valley (Ezekiel 37). He said these bones could live. The bones came together, the sinews came, the skin covered them, but these bones did not live. They did not live until the breath came into them. But when it did, they lived and they stood up and they became an exceedingly great army. Breath is life. I heard Louie Giglio say so many times on this passage: "give God His breath back."

Often when we borrow something we forget to give it back, but if we're borrowing from the Creator of the universe, if we're borrowing breath from the Creator of the universe, if we're borrowing life from the Creator of the universe, let's be a bit more careful. Don't hog your breath, it was never yours to begin with. The rich rules over the poor, and the borrower is servant to the lender (Proverbs 22:7). I'm the borrower. He's the lender. It's time to start serving.



give God His breath back.